Young Adult Programs and Services

Products hot off the press, special events at the ALA Store in San Francisco

Located just outside the Exhibits, the ALA Store at the 2015 ALA Annual Conference offers products that meet the widest range of your promotional and continuing education/professional development needs—as well as fun gift items. Make sure to carve out some time in your schedule to stop by and examine the many new and bestselling items available!

ALA Store hours:

Friday, June 26            12:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Saturday, June 27       8:30 am – 5:00 pm

Sunday, June 28          8:30 am – 5:00 pm

Monday, June 29        9:00 am – 2:00 pm

ALA Graphics will feature a number of popular posters, bookmarks, and promotional materials, including the conference debuts of a new Batgirl poster, the GLBT Book Month Poster, and the 2015 Banned Books Week t-shirt. You’ll want to visit the ALA Store on Saturday for a silent auction of a rare, signed out-of-print Whoopi Goldberg READ poster (winner announced at 4 pm). Snoopy will also be making an appearance on Saturday morning; bring your camera and get a photo with this beloved dog. And stop by early to get your pick of conference t-shirts—they sell out fast!

ALA Editions and ALA divisions are excited to offer several new titles hot off the press, such as “The Weeding Handbook: A Shelf-by-Shelf Guide,” by Rebecca Vnuk; the new ninth edition of OIF’sIntellectual Freedom Manual”; and “A Year of Programs for Millennials and More,” by Amy J. Alessio, Katie LaMantia, and Emily Vinci. Come by the ALA Store for these special Meet the Author events:

Saturday, June 27      

Sunday, June 28         

Remember that you can now find titles from ALA Neal-Schuman and Facet Publishing in the ALA Store. You can also get free shipping on all book orders placed in the ALA Store (posters, bookmarks, and other gift-type items are not eligible for this offer).

Stop by the ALA Store to learn more about our eLearning products, as well as take part in live demos of RDA Toolkit.

Prices at the ALA Store automatically reflect the ALA Member discount, so there’s no need to dig out your Member number. And remember that every dollar you spend at the ALA Store helps support library advocacy, awareness, and other key programs and initiatives!

A bevy of new books, products, special events at the ALA Store at 2015 Midwinter Meeting

Longer hours and easy access near Registration and the Exhibit Hall make it convenient to shop and browse at the ALA Store at Midwinter Meeting in Chicago. The ALA Store offers products that meet the widest range of your promotional and continuing education/professional development needs—as well as fun gift items. Make sure to carve out some time in your schedule to stop by and examine the many new and bestselling items available!

ALA Store hours:

 

Friday, January 30            9:00 am – 5:30 pm

Saturday, January 31       9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Sunday, February 1          9:00 am – 5:00 pm

                 Monday, February 2        9:00 am – 2:00 pm

 

ALA Editions is excited to offer several new titles hot off the press, such as "Managing with Data: Using ACRLMetrics and PLAmetrics," by Peter Hernon, Robert E. Dugan, and Joseph R. Matthews; “Start a Revolution: Stop Acting Like a Library,” by ALA Masters Series speaker Ben Bizzle with Maria Flora; and “The Power of Play: Designing Early Learning Spaces,” by Dorothy Stoltz, Marisa Conner, and James Bradberry. Remember that you can also find ALA Neal-Schuman and Facet titles in the ALA Store. You can also get free shipping on all book orders placed in the ALA Store (posters, bookmarks, and other gift-type items are not eligible for this offer).

Meet high-profile authors and pick up an autographed book or two: use the Scheduler to plan your time at Midwinter Meeting, including the author signings taking place at the ALA Store:

 

·         Dorothy Stoltz and Marisa Conner: Friday, January 30, 4:30 p.m.

o   co-authors of “The Power of Play: Designing Early Learning Spaces

·         Hilda K. Weisberg: Saturday, January 31, 2:30 p.m.

o   author of “New on the Job: A School Librarian's Guide to Success, Second Edition

·         Carole McCollough & Adelaide Poniatowski Phelps: Sunday, February 1, 1:00 p.m.

o   editors of “The Coretta Scott King Awards, 1970 - 2014: Fifth Edition” and authors of “Coretta Scott King Award Books Discussion Guide: Pathways to Democracy

 

Prices at the ALA Store automatically reflect the ALA Member discount, so there’s no need to dig out your member number. And remember that every dollar you spend at the ALA Store helps support library advocacy, awareness, and other key programs and initiatives!

Meet the Authors at ALA Annual

 

Attending the 2013 ALA Annual Conference & Exhibition? Make sure to carve out some time in your schedule and stop by the ALA Store to meet our authors and get an autographed copy of their books!

All the events below will take place in the Exhibit Hall at the ALA Store, booth #1224, an ideal location for easy access and convenient browsing:

 

Friday, June 28             

  • Betsy Diamant-Cohen, Linda Ernst, Saroj Ghoting, and Dorothy Stoltz: 6:00-7:00 p.m.

early literacy experts and authors of such books as Mother Goose on the Loose, Baby Rhyming Time, Every Child Ready for School, and Storytimes For Everyone!

 

Saturday, June 29            

  • Catherine Hakala-Ausperk: 11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

author of the new book Build a Great Team: One Year to Success and the bestseller Be a Great Boss: One Year to Success

  • Tina Coleman and Peggie Llanes: 3:00-4:00 p.m.

authors of the new book The Hipster Librarian's Guide to Teen Craft Projects 2

 

Sunday, June 30              

  • Julia Sweeney and Rob Christopher: 11:15 a.m.-11:45 a.m.

contributors to Queue Tips: Discovering Your Next Great Movie

  • Kenning Arlitsch: 3:00-4:00 p.m.

co-author of the new book Improving the Visibility and Use of Digital Repositories through SEO: A LITA Guide

  • Aaron D. Purcell: 4:00-5:00 p.m.

author of Academic Archives: Managing the Next Generation of College and University Archives, Records, and Special Collections
 

All books by these authors will be 20% off the list price (an additional 10% off the ALA Member price). Use the Conference Scheduler to plan your time!

Continuing the Conversation: Collaborating with Teens to Build Better Library Programs (Part 2)

We just wrapped up the second session of Jennifer Velasquez’s  Workshop Collaborating with Teens to Build Better Library Programs. We had some great discussion during the event--here are some more questions to discuss. Whether you attended or not, feel free to join the conversation!

Jennifer’s Monthly Report Worksheet:
Teen Program Monthly Report
Today’s Slides (in 2 parts):
Collaborating with Teens to Build Better Library Programs Part 3Collaborating with Teens to Build Better Library Programs Part 4

Continuing the Conversation: Collaborating with Teens to Build Better Library Programs

We just wrapped up the first session of Jennifer Velasquez’s  Workshop Collaborating with Teens to Build Better Library Programs. We had some great discussion during the event--here are some more questions to discuss. Whether you attended or not, feel free to join the conversation!

Take a look at Jennifer’s worksheet (embedded below) if your attending session 2.

The Preliminary Readings from Today’s Event: Jennifer’s Worksheet:
Collaborating With Teens Worksheet


Today’s Slides (in 2 parts):
Collaborating with Teens to Build Better Library Programs Part 1 Collaborating with Teens to Build Better Library Programs Part 2

Tips for Young Adult Readers' Advisory

Jessica Moyer and Michael Cox included in the following tips in a presentation at the 2008 YALSA Symposium. It's a brief example of content that will be discussed in Moyer's upcoming ecourse Young Adult Readers' Advisory, which starts on July 5, 2011. 

Do:

  • Stock popular materials and replace them when they wear out or walk out
  • Have nonfiction, graphic novels, magazines and audiobooks in your YA collection
  • Read nonfiction, graphic novels, manga, magazines and adult fiction, and listen to audiobooks of all types, even if it is only in “10 Minutes”
  • Keep a journal to remember what you “read”
  • Suggest nonfiction, graphic novels, manga, audiobooks, and adult fiction
  • Be specific, not abstract when describing your suggestions
  • Admit your likes and dislikes when asked – be honest with your teens!
 
Don’t:
  • EVER make any kind of judging statement when talking to teen readers
  • Suggest really old materials (as in I loved that when I was a teen)
  • Push your favorite books
  • Encourage teens to read “quality” books or “move them up” to better books
  • Tell teens only books (or fiction) count as really “reading”
  • Read only YA books
  • Forget the Rules of Leisure Reading

"A gem of a book ... ought to be on the shelf of every high school guidance counselor in the country"

The stated mission of the American Library Association is, “To provide leadership for the development, promotion, and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all.” New from ALA Editions, How to Pay for College: A Library How-To Handbook is an effective guide emphasizing the help that the local library can offer in this process, using its reference materials, the Internet, and the advice of experienced researchers.

Gail Buckner, writing for FOXBusiness, agrees; in her rave review she notes, "The publishing arm of the American Library Association has assembled a gem of a book that  ... ought to be on the shelf of every high school guidance counselor in the country. How to Pay for College is only slightly larger than a paperback and a bit more than a half inch thick, yet the editors who pulled the information together manage to cover more material than books that are four times larger and twice as expensive. And they do it in plain English. This is not only a book that parents should read, but they should also share it with their teenager."

Check out the full article and then surf on over to the ALA Store and order a copy for your library today!

Twelve-Step Program for Becoming an Urban Fantasy Heroine

Are you tired of your boring, every-day life? Are you dying to live the exciting, adventurous life of an urban fantasy heroine. Just follow these twelve easy steps. You won't even recognize yourself by the time the transformation is completed (and neither will your friends and relatives).
 
1. Be adopted, or be an orphan, or have at least one unknown parent. (Don't whine about this. In the immortal words of Tim Gunn, "Make it work.")   

2. Meditate at length on the circumstances of your extremely unhappy and chaotic childhood. 

3. Drive an eccentric car or motorcycle (for example, a 1970s muscle car, a bright yellow VW beetle, your grannie’s 1985 Buick, an ancient Mercedes, or a sleek Ducati) and be able to fix it yourself when it (inevitably) breaks down. 

4. Live in a unique location in a dark gritty city (for example, a converted warehouse, a walk-up apartment in an iffy neighborhood, or a de-sanctified church)—no suburban ranch or classy colonial for you. 

5. Develop an annoying addiction to a particular designer-label coffee (or tea) and complain bitterly when you are offered any other beverage. 

6. Suffer from crippling levels of guilt and self-doubt, and keep reminding yourself that every single bad thing that happens  to you and your friends and relatives is all your fault—and no  one else’s.  

7. Choose only extremely hot, sexy, tall, muscular, sardonic guys for boyfriends. (Average Joes and shy geeks can’t handle a chick like you.) 

8. Deny your supernatural powers for as long as you possibly can. You didn’t ask for them; you don’t want them. Keep whining, “I just want a normal life.” 

9. Develop skills with as many weapons as you can think of and carry all of them on your person at all times: down your back, beneath your jacket, in your shoes, holstered to your waist, under your hair, down your bra, and strapped to your arms and legs. 

10. Do not cook—not ever. Keep only beer and cheese in your refrigerator and only crackers and peanut butter in your cupboard. (Telephone numbers for local pizza and Chinese take-out are on speed dial.)

11. Wear only black clothing, preferably tight jeans and skimpy tank tops under a black leather jacket (with loops and pockets for weapons, of course),  and underneath it all—lacy silk underwear.

12. Be a redhead, preferably a natural one.

After growing up as the high school principal’s daughter in a small Ohio town (an adolescent’s nightmare),Patricia Mathews inexplicably pursued a career in public education, working as a teacher, program coordinator, and curriculum and assessment designer. She currently has the best job of her life—working behind the reference desk at her local branch library. Before getting caught up in paranormal fiction, her favorite readings were narrative nonfiction and character-driven fiction. Now, however, she can’t resist the heroes and heroines of urban fantasy. She lives in northeastern Ohio with her two cats, and although she watches them carefully, she has never caught them in the act of shape shifting.

Jessica Moyer on Young Adult Readers' Advisory

On January 17, ALA Editions is launching a four-week, facilitated eCourse, Young Adult Readers’ Advisory, with Jessica E. Moyer, an ALA Editions author and LIS adjunct faculty at University of St. Catherine in Minnesota. ALA Editions interviewed Jessica about the course. To learn more and enroll, see the listing at the ALA Store.

I had a chance to talk with Jessica about her background, and what students can expect from this course.

Patrick Hogan: What’s your approach to teaching readers’ advisory in an online environment?

Jessica E. Moyer: One of the reasons I enjoy online teaching is the opportunity for all students to be fully involved in the course, regardless of where they are.  I create weekly discussion topics and expect all students to contribute regularly - the more contributions we have, the better the discussion.  Every time I teach I find that I learn new materials from my students and their interests and experiences.  

PH: What are a few of the factors that distinguish readers’ advisory services with teens from adult service?

JEM: I find that adult readers often know more about they like to read where as teen readers can struggle to say exactly what kind of reading experience they are looking for.  This means librarians suggesting books to teens may need to ask more questions, work with dislikes instead of likes and provide lots of interesting suggestions.  

PH: It seems like establishing rapport would be the critical. If a YA librarian has a knack for that, what readers’ advisory skill would deliver a  big boost in service?

JEM: Knowing how to talk about books in ways that teen will not only understand but will entice them into reading.  Knowing which books are mostly likely to appeal to certain readers.  

PH: A popular perception is that teens have neither the time nor the desire for leisure reading. What is your research telling you on that?

JEM: Teens do want to read, but they are limited by time.  I’ve found, however  that they are more limited by access.  If they can get access to materials they like and want to read, at a time they have a chance to read, they will read.  But often there are too many barriers - not sure what to read, no easy way to get it.  This is one reason I am excited about ebooks and digital library services - anything that will make it easier to get reading materials to teens when they have time to read.  

PH: You’ve probably learned from questions and discussion boards from your previous teaching experience. What about readers’ advisory with teens do librarians find most challenging?

JEM: Knowing when and what adult books to suggest.  Lots of teen readers like reading adult books, but aren’t sure what to read that they will enjoy.  Most teen librarians are familiar with the YA collections but may not know much about adult books so they can be challenged when working with these types of teens.

Help Your Patrons and Your Library Go Green with Make-and-Take Recycled Crafts

Inspire patrons to reuse things they’d ordinarily throw away. Not only does this help the planet, it also fosters creativity, a quality many children don’t cultivate because they spend so much time with technology.

This activity can take place on one day, or you can provide a regular table for make-and-take crafts, varying the project regularly.

Display books featuring crafts made from recycled materials (along with examples of the more complicated projects, if you want to make some).

Set up an area in the library where interested patrons can make some of the simpler crafts to take home. Post directions with the materials, or have someone available to help people. If you lack staff for this activity, try recruiting volunteers. Some high schools have environmental action clubs, whose members might make sample crafts ahead of time and/or work at your event.

Use these super simple ideas, or consult books from the list below. Each issue of Highlights Magazine for Children also offers crafts made from household objects.

If the library doesn’t have enough materials, solicit donations through newsletters and posters.

BOOKMARKS

Children cut off the corners of reply envelopes from junk mail and decorate them with stamps or crayons.

CALENDAR PUZZLES

Children cut old calendar pictures into four to twelve pieces, depending on the picture’s size and the degree of difficulty they want their puzzles to have. Provide reply envelopes from junk mail for storing each puzzle’s pieces.

CALENDAR BINGO (A GAME FOR TWO PLAYERS)

Play Bingo with an old calendar.

Tear off the pages for three months. Make sure at least two start on different days of the week. Cut apart the squares for one month. Mix them up. Spread them out facedown in the middle of the playing area.

Each player puts one of the other months in front of him/her.
Take turns picking up a square and putting it in the corresponding section of your month. Keep playing until someone gets four in a row, vertically, horizontally, or diagonally. That player wins. (The squares need not be consecutive, just in the same row. For example, you could win with 5, 7, 9, and 11 in one week, even though those four numbers aren’t consecutive.)

Store the pages and squares in reused mailing envelopes.

BOOKS WITH CRAFTS FROM RECYCLED MATERIALS (745.5)

Anton, Carrie. Earth Smart Crafts.
Bone, Emily. Recycling Things to Make and Do.
Burke, Judy. Look What You Can Make with Paper Bags.
Chapman, Gillian. Making Art with Packaging.
Friday, Megan. Green Crafts.
Jones, Jen. Cool Crafts with Newspapers, Magazines, and Junk Mail.
Kohl, MaryAnn F. Art with Anything.
Nguyen, Duy. Junk Mail Origami.
Ochester, Betsy. Look What You Can Make with Egg Cartons.
Redleaf, Rhoda. Learn and Play the Green Way: Fun Activities with Reusable Materials*.
Richmond, Margie Hayes. Look What You Can Make with Paper Plates.
_____. Look What You Can Make with Tubes.
Ross, Kathy. Earth-Friendly Crafts
_____. Every Day is Earth Day.
_____. Look What You Can Make with Dozens of Household Items!
_____. Look What You Can Make with Newspapers, Magazines, and Greeting Cards.
_____. Look What You Can Make with Plastic Bottles and Tubs.
Siomades, Lorianne. Look What You Can Make with Boxes.
Sirrine, Carol. Cool Crafts with Old CDs.
_____. Cool Crafts with Old Jeans.
_____. Cool Crafts with Old T-Shirts.
_____. Cool Crafts with Old Wrappers, Cans, and Bottles.
Sullivan, Susan White.The Big Green Book of Recycled Crafts.
Warwick, Ellen. 50 Ways to Get Your Carton.
Young, Karen Romano. Science Fair Winners: Junkyard Science.

*written for adults who work with children

Dee Anderson is the author of Reading Is Funny!: Motivating Kids to Read with Riddles (ALA Editions, 2009)

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