Children's Programming Monthly

Children’s Programming Monthly Subscribers: November Issue Ready for Download

Children’s Programming Monthly subscribers can access the November issue and our 12-month archive at http://alaeditions.org/cpm.

The November issue, Me, Me, Me, focuses on one of a child's favorite subjects: ME. From exploring how the body moves and putting names to feelings to becoming more independent, the programs, listed below are spot on.

  • The Name Game
  • Feelings
  • Me Baby
  • Where is Your Belly Button / Donde esta tu ombligo?
  • All About Me
  • Name Necklaces

Not a subscriber? Learn more and subscribe today.

New Issue of Children's Programming Monthly Now Available!

It’s up! The latest Children’s Programming Monthly is waiting for you. Download the new issue or subscribe to the full year by visiting the ALA Store.

Bugs, bugs, bugs (and an occasional spider and worm). You’ll find plenty of all of them in “Going Buggy,” this month’s roundup of books and activities.  Look for ready-to use programs from Rose Trevino, Diane Briggs, Rob Reid, and others. This fingerplay from Diane Briggs is just one of the great ideas you’ll find to get your program underway.

Here Is the Beehive (Folk Rhyme)

Here is the beehive. Where are the bees? (Hold up your fist)

Hidden away where nobody sees. (Move your other hand around your fist)

Watch and you’ll see them come out of the hive (Bend your head close to your fist)

One, two, three four, five (Hold your fingers up one at a time)

Bzzzzzz……..(Wave your fingers)

Continuing the Conversation: Supporting Early Literacy Through Language-Rich Library Environments

Earlier today, we held the ALA Editions Workshop Supporting Early Literacy through Language Rich Library Environments with Saroj Ghoting. We’re following up with a few of the questions asked during the presentation that we felt merited further discussion: Saroj will be part of the discussion as well!

  • What do you think is the role of technology in promoting early literacy?
  • What is the ideal timeline for replacing displays and material in your space?
  • What’s the difference between open and closed-ended toys? Which type is better in promoting early literacy?

Links to Resources that Saroj Mentioned today:
 

The preliminary readings for this workshop were:

  • Welcoming Place,  Chapter 6 in Designing Space for Children and Teens in Libraries and Public Places by Sandra Feinberg and James Keller. Chicago: ALA, 2010 HUhttp://www.alaeditions.org/files/Feinberg_DesigningSpace_Ch6.pdfU
  • Parent Participation,  Chapter 4 in Learning Environments for Young Children: Rethinking Library Spaces and Services by Sandra Feinberg et al. Chicago: ALA, 1998. HUhttp://www.alaeditions.org/files/Feinberg_LearningEnvironments_Ch4.pdfU
  • Meece, Darrell and Anne Soderman. Setting the Stage for Young Children’s Social Development . Young Children. September 2010 p. 81-86. HUhttp://www.naeyc.org/files/yc/file/201009/MeeceOnline0910.pdfU
  • Greenman, Jim. Places for Childhood in the 21st Century: A Conceptual Framework. Beyond the Journal: Young Children on the Web, May 2005. HUhttp://www.naeyc.org/files/yc/file/200505/01Greenman.pdfU
  • Early Literacy Research-Explained, Chapter 1 in Early Literacy Storytimes @ your library: Partnering with Caregivers for Success by Saroj Ghoting and Pamela Martin-Diaz. Chicago: ALA: 2006 HUhttp://www.alaeditions.org/files/Ghoting_ch1.pdfU
  • The following materials are suggested resources, though they may not be available for free:
  • Copple, Carol and Sue Bredekamp, eds. Developmentally Appropriate Practice in Early Childhood Programs Serving Children from Birth through Age 8 (3rd ed). Washington, DC: NAEYC, 2009.
  • Curtis, Deb and Margie Carter. Designs for Living and Learning: Transforming Early Childhood Environments. St.Paul, MN: Redleaf Press, 2003.
  • Diamant-Cohen, Betsy and Saroj Ghoting. Early Literacy Kit: A Handbook and Tip Cards. Chicago: ALA, 2010. (includes school readiness domains)
  • Feinberg, Sandra and James Keller. Designing Space for Children and Teens in Libraries and Public Places: How to Carve Out a Niche That Epitomizes Service. American Libraries. April 2010, pg. 34-37.
  • Gronlund, Gaye. Developmentally Appropriate Play: Guiding Young Children to a Higher Level. St. Paul, MN: Redleaf Press, 2010.
  • Harmes, Thelma. Environmental Rating Scales--Revised. New York: Teachers College Press, various dates.
  • Neuman, Susan B. et al. User’s Guide to the Child Home Early Language & Literacy Observation (CHELLO) Tool. Baltimore: Paul Brookes, 2007.
  • Seefeldt, Carol. Creating Rooms of Wonder: Valuing and Displaying Children’s Work to Enhance the Learning Process. Beltsville, MD: Gryphon House, 2002.
  • Tough, Paul. Whatever It Takes: Geoffrey Canada’s Quest to Change Harlem and America. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2008.
  • Zigler, Edward. Children’s Play; The Roots of Reading.  Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 2004.
  • Todd Risley interview: Children of the Code   www.childrenofthecode.org/interviews/risley.htm
  • Library Environments for Early Literacy:  www.earlylit.net/libraryenvironment/index.shtml
  • Early Learning Standards  www.nectac.org/topics/quality/earlylearn.asp
  • School Readiness Domains  www.gettingready.org
  • Governors’ Common Core State Standards   www.corestandards.org

Saroj’s Slides:

How Does My Garden Grow? Children’s Programming Monthly v1 #8

You may still be coping with wintery days, but here at Children’s Programming Monthly, we’ve put away the umbrellas. “How Does My Garden Grow?” is ready to download, and it’s blooming with great ideas, books to read aloud, and fun activities:   

  • “Wonderful Worms” by Caroline Feller Bauer
  • “Grow, Grow, Grow!” by Judy Nichols
  • “Gardens” by Saroj Nadkarni Ghoting and Pamela Martin-Diaz
  • “Growing Books” by Sue McCleaf Nespeca and Joan B. Reeve
  • “In Our Garden” by Diane Briggs.

No subscribed yet? Visit us at http://www.alaeditions.org/cpm to sign up. If you have a program you would like to share,  you’ll find submission guidelines at www.alaeditions.org/cpm/submission/guidelines . Or contact me at szvirin@ala.org.

Puddle Weather

When kids start donning slickers, pulling on rubber boots and grabbing umbrellas, it’s time for rainy-day storytimes. “Puddle Weather,” the latest issue of Children’s Programming Monthly, is chockablock with ideas to help you plan. You’ll find enough rhymes, activities, and recording and book suggestions to keep every member of your audience entertained. This issue includes:

  • “It’s Raining, It’s Pouring” by Diane Briggs
  • “Spring Fling” and “Puddlejumpers” by Kathy MacMillan
  • “Parley Garfield and the Frogs,” by Margaret Reed MacDonald
  • “Rain” by Judy Nichols
  • “Craft a Rain Stick” by Caroline Feller Bauer

New Children's Programming Monthly and New Bonus Issue

It’s bonus time! In addition to the regular issue of Children’s Programming Monthly, subscribers can download a free issue, put together especially for those of you getting ready for summer reading programs. Here’s a peek at what you get:

Issue number 6, “My Clothes,” is chockablock with storytime ideas. Share a song or choose a read-aloud from more than thirty book suggestions. Plan a program around making goofy hats or ties. Or have kids help you dress a flannelboard baby. Patterns and instructions are right in the issue.   

In  the “World Wise” bonus you’ll find seven ready-made programs that take children across the world.

  • Chinese Stories”  (activities and books galore)
  • The Foolish Merchant and the Greedy Camel (an easy, one-person puppet play)
  • African Tales: Action (rhymes, fingerplays, and book suggestions)
  • All around the World (songs, books and fun facts to share)
  • The Magic Fox (a folktale to tell aloud)
  • Festivals and Fiestas/Los festivales y las fiestas: (games, rhymes, and songs in Spanish and English)
  • Sing the World (songs and activities that celebrate one world)  

Both issues are ready to download now.

If you don't already subscribe, you can purchase your subscription at the ALA Store.

Submit ideas, get a Free One-Year Subscription to Children’s Programming Monthly

Do you have a successful storytime program to share? Send it to me via e-mail. If it’s selected for publication, we’ll send you a free-one year subscription to the online magazine. All submissions will be acknowledged promptly, and authors will be notified within three months if their program will appear in print. Looking forward to hearing from you….

  1. Activities and books must be appropriate for children preschool through grade 3.
  2. Programs must be submitted electronically (szvirin@ala.org)
  3. Along with read-aloud suggestions, programs can include songs; activities (musical and/ or, movement); rhymes; flannelboards; crafts; fingerplays; lists of additional books or recordings;  early literacy information; and parent follow-up activities.
  4.  Submissions must be accompanied by the author’s name, mailing address, e-mail, daytime phone, and, if applicable, library affiliation.
  5. Illustrations (no photos, please) will be accepted on the basis of quality. Simple diagrams or patterns work best. They should be drawn with black ink on plain white paper and scanned at 300dpi. If electronic submission or artwork isn’t possible, illustrations can be sent separately, to Stephanie Zvirin, ALA Editions, 50 E. Huron, Chicago, IL 60611. Please do not bend or fold the illustrations.
  6. All book suggestions must include the author’s name, publisher, and date of publication.   
  7. Recorded song titles must include the names of the recording and the recording artist.
  8. Previously published programs can’t be accepted.

I'll look forward to hearing your ideas!

New Children's Programming Monthly: Welcome Winter

I don’t know what it’s like where you live, but in Chicago it’s 15 degrees. Our Midwestern weather is one of the reasons the new issue of Children’s Programming Monthly is dedicated to Old Man Winter and his frosty friends.

Not everybody celebrates snow, but it seems enough Editions authors do to enable us to present you with a wonderful array of programs that make the most of bright, snowy days. We can stay toasty indoors while sharing Kathy Macmillan’s comical prop story “Getting Dressed to Play in the Snow” or  singing along to  Rob Reid's gleeful snow-themed adaptation of the old camp song “Do Your Ears Hang Low.” Patterns to outfit a flannelboard snowman, early literacy link for preschoolers, a wealth of books to share…you’ll find it all in this month’s issue.  

You can purchase a single copy of this issue or subscribe to Children's Programming Monthly at the ALA Store.

Childrens Programming Monthly: We Want to Hear Your Ideas!

Well, Children’s Programming Monthly is off to a good start, and we have already had inquiries about submitting programs for publication. Look for submission guidelines in the January issue. In the meantime, we have put together a selection of upcoming issues meant to please. Look for “Add It Up” in December, chockablock with programs and resources to put little ones in a counting mood.  Then welcome winter with our January issue, which promises to keep the fun inside while the cold stays out.  Have children pack their pillows and blankets in February for a cozy pajama party. Our “Good Morning, Good Night” issue will help you plan.

What themes would you like to see in future issues? Maybe a who’s who at the zoo or an issue devoted to stars and the sky?  Do you have great storytime tip? Please share! You can comment on this blog post or e-mail me. You may see your theme blossom into a magazine or your tip as part of a handy CPM Top 10.

If you haven't subscribed yet, be sure to check out the free sample issue available for download.
 

Introducing Children's Programming Monthly

Whether we set the stage with “In the beginning,” “Once upon a time,” or “Long ago and far away,” everyone expects a story to follow. Finding a good story is easy; building a successful storytime isn’t. As librarians, we actively encourage children to come to our programs, but let’s face it, we aren’t all comfortable in front of a group of wiggly, irrepressible kids, and we don’t have time to plan a different program every week. What’s more, longer class visits mean the 20-minute program you presented in the library last year is much too short now.

Whatever your situation, Children’s Programming Monthly, a new online magazine from ALA Editions, will put you a step ahead. This electronic newsletter, available in easy-to-download PDFs, is devoted to ideas that will help you build library programs for children in preschool through grade three. Each themed issue is packed with creative art and craft projects, music and book lists, and ready-to-use storytimes to fit your programming needs.

The simplicity of an electronic the magazine that is easy to view and print will save you time, help you plan, and supply you with fresh ideas culled from some of Editions’ best-selling programming books: Storytime Magic, Early Literacy Storytimes @your library and Leading Kids to Books through Crafts  to name just a few. You can find out more about the magazine and download a free issue here. If you have questions, comments or suggestions, please e-mail me.

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