Career Development

Meet the Authors at ALA Annual

 

Attending the 2013 ALA Annual Conference & Exhibition? Make sure to carve out some time in your schedule and stop by the ALA Store to meet our authors and get an autographed copy of their books!

All the events below will take place in the Exhibit Hall at the ALA Store, booth #1224, an ideal location for easy access and convenient browsing:

 

Friday, June 28             

  • Betsy Diamant-Cohen, Linda Ernst, Saroj Ghoting, and Dorothy Stoltz: 6:00-7:00 p.m.

early literacy experts and authors of such books as Mother Goose on the Loose, Baby Rhyming Time, Every Child Ready for School, and Storytimes For Everyone!

 

Saturday, June 29            

  • Catherine Hakala-Ausperk: 11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

author of the new book Build a Great Team: One Year to Success and the bestseller Be a Great Boss: One Year to Success

  • Tina Coleman and Peggie Llanes: 3:00-4:00 p.m.

authors of the new book The Hipster Librarian's Guide to Teen Craft Projects 2

 

Sunday, June 30              

  • Julia Sweeney and Rob Christopher: 11:15 a.m.-11:45 a.m.

contributors to Queue Tips: Discovering Your Next Great Movie

  • Kenning Arlitsch: 3:00-4:00 p.m.

co-author of the new book Improving the Visibility and Use of Digital Repositories through SEO: A LITA Guide

  • Aaron D. Purcell: 4:00-5:00 p.m.

author of Academic Archives: Managing the Next Generation of College and University Archives, Records, and Special Collections
 

All books by these authors will be 20% off the list price (an additional 10% off the ALA Member price). Use the Conference Scheduler to plan your time!

Continuing the Conversation: Hiring, Training and Supervising Library Shelvers

We just wrapped up Pat Tunstall’s three-part workshop Hiring, Training and Supervising Library Shelvers. This was a fantastic event with some great discussion! 

Pat’s slides for all three parts are posted below. If you didn’t have a chance to participate, check them out!

Continuing the Conversation: Real-Life Strategies for Successful Library Job-Hunting

We just wrapped up Real-Life Strategies for Successful Library Job Hunting: A Forum. Thanks to everyone who attended, to our facilitators Andromeda Yelton and Tiffany Mair, and to JobList, HRDR and Hack Library School for their support.

Don't forget to register for ALA JobList's upcoming Webinar How to Get Unstuck in Your Job Search with Dr. Caitlin Williams, Ph.D.

Keeping up with ALA JobLIST

ALA JobLIST – http://joblist.ala.org
ALA JobLIST Placement Center information – http://joblist.ala.org/placementcenter.cfm
ALA JobLIST Direct e-newsletter subscription form and archive – http://ala.informz.net/ala/profile.asp?fid=1494
Facebook – www.facebook.com/ALA.JobLIST
Twitter – http://twitter.com/ALA_JobLIST
LinkedIn subgroup: “Librarianship Job Search and Careers” – www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=3889987
Google+ – https://plus.google.com/111534792451545791464?prsrc=3


ALA  JobLIST Webinars, Podcasts, and Chats http://www.joblist.ala.org/modules/jobseeker/multimedia.cfm

For resources and more, view Hack Library School's Google Doc for today's event: http://bit.ly/ysoOVJ

If you missed the event or you’d like to view it again, please check out the archive:

archive

Tiffany and Andromeda's Slides:

Real Life Strategies for Successful Library Job Hunting

Archive: Tactics for Library Job Hunting in a Tough Market with Jeannette Woodward

Earlier today, we wrapped up our webinar Tactics for Library Job Hunting in a Tough Market with Jeanette Woodward. We want to give a special thanks to our sponsors, LearningExpress and Mango Languages, for making this session possible.

If you’d like to view the archive of this event, it’s available at http://bit.ly/qNA232

Jeanette’s Slides

Tactics for Library Job Hunting in a Tough Market

Continuing the Conversation: Patron-Driven Acquisition: Radically Re-Thinking the Collection, Session 1

Due to the large number of questions that emerged from the first session of Rick Anderon's workshop Patron-Driven Acquisition: Radically Re-Thinking the Collection, we have posted Rick's responses as a separate blog post. Feel free to chime in via the comments area and join in the discussion!

We just wrapped up the first session of the ALA Editions Workshop Patron-Driven Acquisition: Radically Rethinking the Collection  with Rick Anderson. We had some fantastic discussion during this event, and we’re using the comments area of this post to continue it. Whether you attended or not, feel free to join the conversation!

Discussion Questions

  • What’s your definition of Patron-Driven Acquisition?
  • The presentation presumes that print is dead, which is debatable. The Gutenberg led to mass -produced books, therefore allowing multiple simultaneous users. Could you elaborate or give your perspective on the difference between book as abstract text and book as object?
  • If librarians aren’t good at selecting, who is? Selection by librarians saves the time of the user. People want the best sources, but often settle for the easiest to find. Librarians’ selection skills give users accurate information. Regarding the concept of “at least one use,”  do we have research on whether what patrons acquire is what they need?
  • It seems there is a tension between libraries roles in archiving and giving access.For large research libraries, collecting for current users has to go hand-in-hand with preserving the scholarly record for unanticipated future uses. Circulation statistics can’t capture that role, yet it’s important.
  • Are libraries using PDA with media other than books and articles?
  • What are the considerations for the library's systems department in implementing PDA?

Rick’s SlidesPatron-Driven Acquisition: Radically Re-Thinking the Collection, Session 1

Community Partnership: How to Raise Money and Build Relationships

Paul Signorelli is currently teaching the ALA Editions eCourse Community Partnership: Raising Money and Building Relationships. The course begins today, but its not too late to register at the ALA Store.

At a very important yet oft-overlooked level, every member of library staff is now a fundraiser in a very competitive environment. That’s because great fundraising comes from the building of great relationships, and all library staff members play a role in nurturing and sustaining positive and mutually beneficial relationships between libraries and the communities they serve—in good as well as in challenging times.

Fostering effective collaborations is at the heart of the ALA Editions’ Community Partnership: How to Raise Money and Build Relationships, which runs online from Monday, October 3 through Sunday, October 30, 2011. But don’t let the fundraising aspect scare you. We’re as much concerned here with the collaboration-relationship side of the equation as we are with the funding and in-kind gifts that result from those relationships.

There are wonderful resources to be explored here, including the Urban Libraries Council report Making Cities Stronger: Public Library Contributions to Local Economic Development. It’s as fresh today as it was when it was published in January 2007. We’ll be using it as an anchor to our explorations and discussions of how partnerships are developed and what some of our most creative colleagues have been doing to serve as active participants within their communities.

We’ll also have access to the complete version of Providing for Knowledge, Growth, and Prosperity: A Benefit Study of the San Francisco Public Library rather than the executive summary that is available on the Internet. Reading and discussing that document in conjunction with the use of other articles, short online videos, and PowerPoint presentations from several sources will help us recognize the benefits we bring to our communities so we can better demonstrate the worth of our organizations to our current and prospective community partners.

And we’ll finish this four-week interactive course with an in-depth look at one of the hottest recent library-business community partnerships—the e-reader project between the Sacramento Public Library and Barnes & Noble.

There will be plenty of other resources to explore, and the collaborations we develop will include the interactions among our learning colleagues from libraries across the country as we use an online bulletin board to share weekly assignment postings, engage in optional weekly office-hour chats, and produce resources we can immediately use in our efforts to create, nurture, and sustain partnerships that benefit our communities.

To register, please visit the ALA Store.

A Free Webinar for Library Job Hunters

reportJeannette Woodward, author of our special report A Librarian’s Guide to an Uncertain Job Market will host the webinar “Tactics for Library Job Hunting in a Tough Market” on October 20, 2011 at 1:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Thank you Mango Languages and LearningExpress for sponsoring the webinar. Register today!

Below is a sample from the report. We are offering $5.00 off the special report, in all formats print, eEdition, or combined. Visit the listing in the ALA Store and use the coupon code LGJF11. Offer expires October 17. 2011.
UPDATE(Oct 3): Bigger savings! Use this coupon code for a 50 percent discount on any format. 
Employment Prospects for LIS Professionals

Continuing the Conversation: Be a Great Boss

We just wrapped up the ALA Editions Workshop Be a Great Boss  with Cathy Hakala-Ausperk. We had some fantastic discussion during this event, and we’re using the comments area of this post to continue it. Whether you attended or not, feel free to join the conversation!

The Preliminary Readings from Today’s Event
Cathy’s Slides

Be a Great Boss--ALA Editions Workshop

"A gem of a book ... ought to be on the shelf of every high school guidance counselor in the country"

The stated mission of the American Library Association is, “To provide leadership for the development, promotion, and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all.” New from ALA Editions, How to Pay for College: A Library How-To Handbook is an effective guide emphasizing the help that the local library can offer in this process, using its reference materials, the Internet, and the advice of experienced researchers.

Gail Buckner, writing for FOXBusiness, agrees; in her rave review she notes, "The publishing arm of the American Library Association has assembled a gem of a book that  ... ought to be on the shelf of every high school guidance counselor in the country. How to Pay for College is only slightly larger than a paperback and a bit more than a half inch thick, yet the editors who pulled the information together manage to cover more material than books that are four times larger and twice as expensive. And they do it in plain English. This is not only a book that parents should read, but they should also share it with their teenager."

Check out the full article and then surf on over to the ALA Store and order a copy for your library today!

Rethinking Library Patron Instruction: Libraries as Social Learning Centers

Social learning—a theme to be explored in ALA Editions’ Rethinking Library Instruction: Libraries as Social Learning Centers ecourse as we prepare materials to help library users learn what they need to learn about library resources—is hardly new. But it is something that is going to leave us far behind if we don’t jump in and stake our claim sooner than later.

Tony Bingham (President and CEO of ASTD—the American Society for Training & Development) and Marcia Conner (partner with Altimeter Group and a columnist for Fast Company magazine) provide a wonderful introduction to the topic in The New Social Learning: A Guide to Transforming Organizations Through Social Media. And Char Booth addresses the topic in the library context in her ALA Editions book Reflective Teaching, Effective Learning: Instructional Literacy for Library Educators, particularly in “Learning from/with Others” (chapter 3).

A few of us, furthermore, are beginning to document and promote the important role libraries are and can be playing in becoming social learning centers onsite as well as online. We already have the model of the academic information commons. And we’re beginning to see public library versions including the Denver Public Library Community Technology Center and Brooklyn Public Library’s Leon Levy Information Commons that was approved in 2010.

The Digital Youth Network and its fabulous YOUMedia collaboration for teens with the Chicago Public Library is the latest library social learning space to receive widespread attention; highlighted in the MacArthur Foundation’s Panel Discussion on Re-Imagining Learning in the 21st Century and Digital Media: New Learners of the 21st Century,  the 50-minute PBS program which is at the heart of the Panel Discussion program, YOUMedia demonstrates that dreams of libraries as social learning centers are far from being flights of fantasy.

Karen Cator, Director of the office of Educational Technology in the U.S. Department of Education —just one of several Panel Discussion presenters—overtly provides the big picture for anyone interested in social learning: “We have an incredible opportunity to transform learning into a deeply social experience, one that can leverage mobile technologies, social networking, and digital content. We can leverage the long tail of interest and design education environments that include prior experience, outside-of-school experience, multiple languages, families, the community, all the places that students live and breathe…”

Chicago Public Library chief Mary Dempsey, in the same program, brings it closer to home by noting that libraries are no longer “just about information consumption.” Through innovations such as the Library’s YOUMedia space, libraries can help learners take advantage of environments where they are surrounded by new media and a world where “learning takes place anywhere and anytime,” she says.

And Elise Valoe, in an American Libraries magazine article (“The Evolving Library: Supporting New Teaching, Learning Styles”), reports that “libraries are now collaborative environments where individuals and groups converge to study, socialize, and gain access to resources…the library is a center of interactive learning” fostering social learning.

It’s probably clear to everyone by now that part of what we are rethinking in the ALA Editions ecourse is what it means to produce library patron instruction in an onsite-online world where synchronous and asynchronous learning are seamlessly interwoven. As we think about learning environments—those physical and virtual places where learning occurs—we have to remember that we still serve significant numbers of people face to face, at their moment of need. We also need to remember that we serve a significant number of people via online access at computer workstations and through wireless connections within library building. And there’s that third dimension in which an overwhelming majority of those we serve are arriving in our libraries online rather than physically entering our buildings.

Our social learning environments have to be adaptable to meet our users’ continuing as well as evolving learning needs. We also need to be as adaptable as we possibly can be in terms of effectively employing technology to reach and respond to library users. And we have to willingly embrace the increasing important role that nearly everyone working in libraries can and must  play as trainer-teacher-learners prepared to facilitate the learning process for all whom we serve.

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