Buildings and Facilities

Meet the Authors at ALA Annual

 

Attending the 2013 ALA Annual Conference & Exhibition? Make sure to carve out some time in your schedule and stop by the ALA Store to meet our authors and get an autographed copy of their books!

All the events below will take place in the Exhibit Hall at the ALA Store, booth #1224, an ideal location for easy access and convenient browsing:

 

Friday, June 28             

  • Betsy Diamant-Cohen, Linda Ernst, Saroj Ghoting, and Dorothy Stoltz: 6:00-7:00 p.m.

early literacy experts and authors of such books as Mother Goose on the Loose, Baby Rhyming Time, Every Child Ready for School, and Storytimes For Everyone!

 

Saturday, June 29            

  • Catherine Hakala-Ausperk: 11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

author of the new book Build a Great Team: One Year to Success and the bestseller Be a Great Boss: One Year to Success

  • Tina Coleman and Peggie Llanes: 3:00-4:00 p.m.

authors of the new book The Hipster Librarian's Guide to Teen Craft Projects 2

 

Sunday, June 30              

  • Julia Sweeney and Rob Christopher: 11:15 a.m.-11:45 a.m.

contributors to Queue Tips: Discovering Your Next Great Movie

  • Kenning Arlitsch: 3:00-4:00 p.m.

co-author of the new book Improving the Visibility and Use of Digital Repositories through SEO: A LITA Guide

  • Aaron D. Purcell: 4:00-5:00 p.m.

author of Academic Archives: Managing the Next Generation of College and University Archives, Records, and Special Collections
 

All books by these authors will be 20% off the list price (an additional 10% off the ALA Member price). Use the Conference Scheduler to plan your time!

Continuing the Conversation: 12 Essential Elements for a Safe and Secure Library

We just wrapped up the Warren Graham’s Workshop 12 Essential Elements for a Safe and Secure Library. If you didn’t have a chance to attend, check out Sean’s slides, posted below!

If you want more resources on this topic, check out Warren’s Book The Black Belt Librarian: Real-World Safety & Security.

Warren’s Slides are Available Here:

Continuing the Conversation: Making Space for Entrepreneurs and Independent Workers

We just wrapped up Meg Knodl’s ALA Editions Workshop Making Space for Entrepreneurs and Independent Workers. Meg introduced the attendees to this exciting new topic, and there was a lot of fantastic discussion on how library spaces can be transformed to accommodate a new and growing segment of the workforce. Whether you attended or not, feel free to chime in via the comments area with questions or comments.

The Readings for Today’s Workshop:

Resources Mentioned During the Workshop:

Meg’s Slides:
Making Space for Entrepreneurs and Independent Workers

Welcome to alaeditions.org!

I would like to welcome you to Editions.org and our open-forum blog. It is my privilege to be the Publisher of both TechSource (subscriptions, e-learning, webinars, and workshops) and Editions (professional and reference books, both print and electronic). My team is part of a larger unit at the American Library Association called Publishing.

The dirty little secret is that I am not a librarian, but I know a great deal about what librarians do, what they think about, and what they are concerned about.  But I never know enough; I will never be close enough to the action because I do not work in a library. So my colleagues and I depend on you tell us what is going on and what you need for your professional development. And here is a chance for you to do just that.

Something that we in publishing share with librarians of all kinds is high anxiety about how quickly our work world is changing. I am old enough (the proverbial 39, thank you Mr. Benny) to remember when the art and science of putting a book together meant having a hand-written manuscript typed by two different people (in order to ensure that the material was correct), comparing the documents, creating a master with hand edits, and sending it off to the compositor—who made galleys. (And why did we call them galleys, anyway. A galley is a long metal tray that holds type ready for printing.)

The galleys would be edited, read by the author, edited and corrected again, and sent back to the author. Changes would be made again until we finally had page proofs, which were sent back to the author and then to a proof reader. Cover art had to be hand drawn; even charts, graphs, and other display elements were hand drawn—we had an art department with lighted tables, for goodness sake.  And permission letters were a horrible bore—they took forever to do and get back. Did I forget the index……done manually? Once the art was in place and the index readied the second set of page proofs were sent off to the author. Corrections always came back, no matter how often you explained that an author could not rewrite anything! Finally, everything was sent to the printer, who put the book under the camera to make film, to make plates....and on and on.

Well, the back and forth still goes on, and we still go to the printer (for how long, one wonders). But it is all so wonderfully different now; still a lot of work for both author and publisher, but our output is more than just a physical book. It can be a PDF of the book you can print yourself; but it also can be an e-bundle that allows you to read one of our books on your Kindle or iPad or whatever your favorite device happens to be.

And of course, this is part of our shared high anxiety: Will an actual book disappear? Some may remember a quaint little movie “84 Charing Cross Road” with Anne Bancroft and Anthony Hopkins from 1986—a movie that glorified and revered not only books, but old books. In it are great scenes from the proverbial musty book shop in the basement of a London building. The staff was totally devoted to and knowledgeable about books, great ones and little volumes of seemingly no consequence other than the fact that someone wanted to own them and read them. To have them. Librarians and publishers alike are anxiously asking if patrons will continue to want and to own books. And no one knows for sure.

Now I have to confess my second dirty little secret: I have owned a Kindle for over two years, and I love it. Not only do I love it, I take it everywhere. My non-publishing friends are scandalized. But you are a book publisher. No, I respond, I am a publisher and my world has changed greatly. I want librarians to own our books, courses, and newsletters, but I don’t care if they buy an actual book or something they load on their Sony Reader. Just tell us by your buying decisions that we are publishing correctly for you. What I really want to know is if our content is helping librarians be better librarians, which is what ALA Publishing in general and TechSource and Editions in particular are all about.

So, welcome again to our blog. We want to talk about anything that has to do with books, with publishing, with libraries, with technology…..come join the party.

Michael


P.S. Many of you may have heard that Barnes & Noble is for sale. Leonard Riggio, the founder, will probably lead a group of investors and take the chain private (again). It was not long ago that the entire industry was in fear and trepidation about the power and control that the super store chains would have on the book world.  Everyone fretted that one company, with over 700 stores, would so dominate the market. They indeed did change the landscape. There are very few independent stores around. In 2001, B & N’s total market capitalization was $2.2 billion while Amazon’s capitalization was $3.6 billion.

Now the shoe is on the other foot. B & N today is capitalized at $950 million while Amazon is currently at $55 billion. Who’s the monster now…….?
 

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